They prefer alternative to single-source, PCP favored by older generations

 

ORLANDO--The most powerful demographic group – millennials, ages 21-32, empowered by advances in technology – are turning America’s healthcare landscape upside down.

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Changing Trends in Medicine

Dr. Tom Dooley Foundation highlighted at AAPS annual awards dinner

 

During the American Association of Physician Specialists, Inc.’s (AAPS) 2015 House of Delegates and Annual Scientific Meeting June 26-July 1 at the Hilton Clearwater Beach in Clearwater Beach, a very special guest will keynote the June 27 President’s Awards Dinner: Richard Lavely, MD, JD, MS, MPH...

By JULIE PARKER

Five Ways Millennials Have Shaken Up Healthcare

They prefer alternative to single-source, PCP favored by older generations

 

ORLANDO--The most powerful demographic group – millennials, ages 21-32, empowered by advances in technology – are turning America’s healthcare landscape upside down.

By JULIE PARKER

The Challenge of Getting Paid

This partner in patient receivables doesn’t get paid until hospitals save money

 

As the American culture shifts to grind more financial responsibility onto patients, hospitals are facing more costly hurtles.

By JULIE PARKER

Advancing Treatments in PAD

Largo Medical Center is the first Pinellas County hospital to use Medtronic’s newly FDA-approved, drug-coated balloon

 

LARGO—On March 2 at Largo Medical Center, Chris Wagner checked in at 6 am for a new minimally invasive procedure to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in his right leg. For nine years, he’d suffered from PAD, a debilitating condition that occurs when arteries in the leg become narrowed or blocked by plaque.

By JULIE PARKER

PHYSICIAN SPOTLIGHT: Karen Hamad, MD

First Physicians Group, Sarasota Memorial Health Care System

 

SARASOTA - “If you had told me 5 years ago that one day I would be chief of staff of an 800-bed hospital I would have said you were crazy,” said Karen Hamad.

By JEFF WEBB

The Rise and Fall of Nuclear Cardiology

Nuclear cardiology became a cornerstone of the cardiology specialty in early 1980s.

 

It was an innovative technology that provided better, more accurate non-invasive testing. It helped screen, assess and quantitate cardiac ischemia.

By J.B. BITAR, MD, FACC

MAY 2015 GRAND ROUNDS

Brief business news items from the local healthcare community.

 

The Sun DailySouth Korea's tally of MERS cases at seven; one suspected patient heads to ChinaReutersSEOUL South Korea's tally of patients of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) rose to seven on Thursday, with authorities saying one suspected victim skipped out of voluntary home quarantine to take a trip to China. A rise in MERS cases has stirred ...S Korea on alert over spread of MERSAsiaOneS. Korea reports seven MERS cases, one suspect flies to ChinaThe Sun DailySouth Korea reports seven MERS cases, one suspect flies to ChinaZee Newsecns -Arirang News -Yonhap Newsall 88 news articles »

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 21:15

Daily MailPorridge and high fibre for breakfast cuts the risk of diabetes by nearly a fifthDaily MailScientists found an increase in fibre, especially cereals, in the diet was linked to a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A new study shows those with the highest total fibre intake - more than 26g per day - had an 18 per cent lower risk of developing ...and more »

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 02:03

CTV NewsLifespan lengthening for those with MS, but still live 7.5 years less than othersCTV NewsTORONTO -- Life expectancy for people who have multiple sclerosis is lengthening but is still about 7.5 years shorter than that of people who do not have the disease, a new study suggests. A team of researchers led by Dr. Ruth Ann Marrie of the University of ...Multiple Sclerosis Community Celebrates World MS DayMultiple Sclerosis News TodayMultiple Sclerosis May Triple the Risk of Early Death for Younger PatientsHealthlineMS May Raise Odds for Earlier Death, Study FindsHealthDayall 31 news articles »

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 19:37

Youth Health MagzineBreast Cancer Is Sinister, Changes Bone to SpreadYouth Health MagzineBreast cancer certainly has nefarious means of spreading and becoming more difficult to treat. In a new study, for example, it's been found out that it changes the structure of bones. A team of cancer experts from the University of Sheffield has recently ...Breast cancer 'alters bone to help it spread'BBC NewsBreast cancer could be 'stopped in its tracks' by new technique, say scientistsThe GuardianThe £1 Medication to Block Spread of Breast CancerNY City NewsWestern Daily Press -Daily Mailall 25 news articles »

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 23:02

MedscapeFDA Clears Two Treatments for Irritable Bowel Syndrome with DiarrheaWall Street JournalThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared two treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea, approving drugs that are both linked to recent merger activity in the sector. Salix Pharmaceuticals Ltd.'s top-selling antibiotic Xifaxan, already ...UPDATE 1-FDA approves Actavis, Valeant drugs for irritable bowel syndromeReutersFDA approves two therapies to treat IBS-DFDA.govall 31 news articles »

Wednesday, May 27, 2015 - 18:58

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