They prefer alternative to single-source, PCP favored by older generations

 

ORLANDO--The most powerful demographic group – millennials, ages 21-32, empowered by advances in technology – are turning America’s healthcare landscape upside down.

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Changing Trends in Medicine

Dr. Tom Dooley Foundation highlighted at AAPS annual awards dinner

 

During the American Association of Physician Specialists, Inc.’s (AAPS) 2015 House of Delegates and Annual Scientific Meeting June 26-July 1 at the Hilton Clearwater Beach in Clearwater Beach, a very special guest will keynote the June 27 President’s Awards Dinner: Richard Lavely, MD, JD, MS, MPH...

By JULIE PARKER

The Challenge of Getting Paid

This partner in patient receivables doesn’t get paid until hospitals save money

 

As the American culture shifts to grind more financial responsibility onto patients, hospitals are facing more costly hurtles.

By JULIE PARKER

Five Ways Millennials Have Shaken Up Healthcare

They prefer alternative to single-source, PCP favored by older generations

 

ORLANDO--The most powerful demographic group – millennials, ages 21-32, empowered by advances in technology – are turning America’s healthcare landscape upside down.

By JULIE PARKER

Advancing Treatments in PAD

Largo Medical Center is the first Pinellas County hospital to use Medtronic’s newly FDA-approved, drug-coated balloon

 

LARGO—On March 2 at Largo Medical Center, Chris Wagner checked in at 6 am for a new minimally invasive procedure to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in his right leg. For nine years, he’d suffered from PAD, a debilitating condition that occurs when arteries in the leg become narrowed or blocked by plaque.

By JULIE PARKER

PHYSICIAN SPOTLIGHT: Karen Hamad, MD

First Physicians Group, Sarasota Memorial Health Care System

 

SARASOTA - “If you had told me 5 years ago that one day I would be chief of staff of an 800-bed hospital I would have said you were crazy,” said Karen Hamad.

By JEFF WEBB

The Rise and Fall of Nuclear Cardiology

Nuclear cardiology became a cornerstone of the cardiology specialty in early 1980s.

 

It was an innovative technology that provided better, more accurate non-invasive testing. It helped screen, assess and quantitate cardiac ischemia.

By J.B. BITAR, MD, FACC

MAY 2015 GRAND ROUNDS

Brief business news items from the local healthcare community.

 

CNNFDA to evaluate risk of codeine cough and cold meds for childrenCNN(CNN) The Food and Drug Administration says it will take a closer look at cough and cold medicines for children that contain codeine. "We are evaluating all available information and will also consult with external experts by convening an advisory ...Health Highlights: July 2, 2015U.S. News & World ReportFDA Reviewing Safety of Codeine in Kids Under 18WebMDFDA to evaluate risk of codeine meds for kidsWPTZ The Champlain ValleyHealioall 11 news articles »

Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 13:35

The Daily StarCongo and WHO investigate possible Ebola outbreakDaily MailKINSHASA, July 2 (Reuters) - Health officials in Democratic Republic of Congo are investigating a possible outbreak of Ebola in a village about 270 km (170 miles) northeast of the capital Kinshasa, the government and the World Health Organization (WHO) ...WHO, Congo Investigate Possible Ebola OutbreakSaudi Press Agencyall 15 news articles »

Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 13:47

MedPage TodayPurdue Pulls New OxyContin Application, and Questions FollowMedPage Todaysavesaved. author name. by Kristina Fiore Staff Writer, MedPage Today. Purdue's withdrawal of a supplemental New Drug Application related to its abuse-deterrent formulation of OxyContin has raised questions about postmarketing requirements for the drug.In rare move, Purdue pulls out of abuse-deterrent OxyContin meeting with FDABioPharma DiveThe OxyContin Clan: The $14 Billion Newcomer to Forbes 2015 List of Richest ...ForbesOxyContin Maker Bows Out of Meeting on Harder-To-Abuse DrugNew York Timesall 77 news articles »

Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 14:31

NBCNews.comJ&J vaccine completely prevented HIV in half of monkeys in trialReutersCHICAGO An experimental Johnson & Johnson vaccine completely prevented HIV infection in half of monkeys that got the shot and then were exposed to high doses of an aggressive virus, results that spurred the company to test the vaccine in people, ...New AIDS Vaccine Protects MonkeysNBCNews.comHIV investigators at Harvard, J&J see promise in early-stage vaccineFierceBiotechInvestigational HIV vaccine regimen shows encouraging results in non-human ...Medical XpressEurekAlert (press release)all 6 news articles »

Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 13:01

ReutersSuperbug threat prompts West to revisit Soviet-era virus therapyReutersLONDON. Alarmed by rising resistance to antibiotics scientists and governments are taking a fresh look at bacteria-chomping viruses first isolated a century ago from the stools of patients recovering from dysentery. Bacteriophages, which attack ...and more »

Thursday, July 2, 2015 - 09:42

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